3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1

Sunset at the Acropolis Athens Greece 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1
Sunset at the Acropolis Athens Greece

If you love history, culture, romance, food and adventure, then Greece is the place for you. Greece is the birthplace of the western world, philosophy, democracy, amazing food, and some of the best weather in the world. In this article we will cover 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary, Part 1 of a multi-part series on Greece.

National Geographic Greatest Landscapes: Stunning Photographs That Inspire and Astonish Hardcover
National Geographic Greatest Landscapes: Stunning Photographs That Inspire and Astonish Hardcover

We had been working our way to Greece for years and then Covid happened and everything was put on hold. Then finally in 2023 it became a reality again.
This itinerary was build based on years of study, the reading of the “Rick Steves Greece: Athens & the Peloponnese” guide book and with working with our local travel expert and an in country tour expert. More details on this in the notes.

We decided to travel with a small tour group (13 people in our group) so that we could have a local guide and many of the details of transportation and accommodations would be handled for us. This allows us to see the most possible sites with the least hassle and yet have some flexibility in the actual things we did on a day to day basis. First off, we did not want to do the standard cruise type travel where you can only see the highlights. Secondly, we wanted to see and experience things more slowly and more intimately. Hence, we found a 15 day tour of Greece that covered most of the places that we wanted to see, then we added some time at the beginning and end of the tour to add a few more specific itinerary items.

Map for 3 Days in Athens ~ Your Perfect Itinerary

Map for 3 Days in Athens ~ Your Perfect Itinerary
Map for 3 Days in Athens ~ Your Perfect Itinerary

Click the link for the Google Map of 3 Days in Athens ~ Your Perfect Itinerary.

Athens

Step one is to get to Athens. We flew to Athens through Amsterdam. It was a long day of flying but all went as expected. Our travel agent encouraged us to get around Athens via a taxi. They are numerous, reliable and cheap. It was a 45 minute taxi ride from the Airport to our hotel that was within walking distance to many of the tourist sites in Athens.

First Impressions of Athens Omonia Square 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1
First Impressions of Athens ~ Omonia Square

When our taxi driver dropped us off at the hotel, he told us the hotel was fine but he warned us, be careful, this area is not safe. He told us to ask the hotel desk help for more details. We did, the hotel staff agreed, the area is not safe, and he called it decadent. We asked for clarification. He said do not worry about bodily harm, it is safe that way. But watch your wallet and you valuables. Don’t open your wallet in public. Be very cautious in the metro. Always be aware of your surroundings. I guess this is normal big city stuff.
You will see some homeless people around and there is some poverty but, we never felt unsafe.

Omonia Square

First Impressions of Athens Omonia Square 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1
First Impressions of Athens ~ Fountain at Omonia Square

So off we went with camera in hand looking for a great dinner and some first impressions. Our hotel was a bit north of the Parthenon/ Acropolis so we headed in that direction. We ended up in the center of the city, Omonia Square. I must say, it felt a bit like Times Square.
Our first dinner in Greece was delightful.

First Impressions of Athens Omonia Square 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1
First Impressions of Athens ~ Omonia Square

First Day of Exploring On Your Own

After your long flight and your first Greek meal, I hope you get a great night sleep because it is time to hit the city running.  The first day or so of exploring can be done completely by walking.
Our first spot to explore was Syntagmatic Square but there are a few things to see on the say there.

Klafthmonos Square

Klafthmonos Square is the center of what is called the Historical Center of Athens. In the center of the square once stood the Mint, as well the Ministry of Finance.
In the square is an impressionistic monumental bronze sculptural group of three intertwined figures (1988) by Vasilis Doropoulos symbolizing National Reconciliation.

impressionistic monumental bronze sculptural group of three intertwined figures (1988) by Vasilis Doropoulos
Impressionistic monumental bronze sculptural group of three intertwined figures (1988) by Vasilis Doropoulos

Old Parliament House – National Historical Museum

Old Parliament House - National Historical Museum
Old Parliament House – National Historical Museum

The National Historical Museum Athens, Founded in 1882, is the oldest of its kind in Greece. It is located in the Old Parliament House at Stadiou Street in Athens, which housed the Hellenic Parliament from 1875 until 1932. A branch of the National History Museum has been organized and operated there since 2001.

General Theodoros Kolokotronis
General Theodoros Kolokotronis

In front of the building stands a large bronze equestrian statue of General Theodoros Kolokotronis. The bronze statue of the commander in chief of the Revolution of 1821 is a work of sculptor Lazaros Sochos (1862-1911)

Syntagma Square

Syntagma Square is a great target for your first adventure. This location is also know as “Constitution Square” and is the central spot for much activity in Athens. The square is named for the Constitution that German King Otto, the first King of Greece, was forced to create after a military uprising on September 3rd, 1843. It is located below the 19th-century Old Royal Palace, housing the Greek Parliament since 1934. Syntagma Square is an important square of modern Athens from both a historical and social point of view, at the heart of commercial activity and Greek politics. The name Syntagma also refers to the neighborhood surrounding the square.

Greek Parliament Building ~ Parliament of the Hellenes

Hellenic Parliament or Greek Parliament, officially known as the Parliament of the Hellenes
Hellenic Parliament or Greek Parliament, officially known as the Parliament of the Hellenes

The Hellenic Parliament or Greek Parliament, officially known as the Parliament of the Hellenes, is the home of legislature of Greece, located in the Old Royal Palace, overlooking Syntagma Square in Athens. The parliament is the supreme democratic institution that represents the citizens through an elected body of Members of Parliament (MPs). Gosh, sounds kind of British. This is a beautiful building and it is home of the iconic Greek Guards.

Greek guards or “Evzones”
Greek guards or “Evzones”

Greek guards or “Evzones” are members of the Presidential Guard found outside the Hellenic Parliament. They have become synonymous with the city of Athens and were originally founded in 1868 as a regiment of the Greek army. Stick around to watch the special ceremony on the top and bottom of the hour. You will be glad you did.

National Garden

National Garden Athens Greece ~ 3 Days In Athens Your Perfect Greece Itinerary Part 1
National Garden Athens Greece

The National Garden is right near the Parliament Building and it is worth your time to visit. It gives you a respite of peace and beauty in a busy warm city.

Fountain National Garden Athens Greece
Fountain National Garden Athens Greece

Church of Panagia Kapnikarea

Church of Panagia Kapnikarea Athens Greece
Church of Panagia Kapnikarea Athens Greece

If you love history and architecture check out The Church of Panagia Kapnikarea. The Church of Panagia Kapnikarea or just Kapnikarea is a Greek Orthodox Church and one of the oldest churches in Athens. You will see many of these churches around the country. Be sure to stop in to help you get a better sense of the history, people, and culture.

Church of Panagia Kapnikarea
Church of Panagia Kapnikarea

The Roman Forum of Athens ~ Roman Agora

The Roman Agora at Athens is located to the north of the Acropolis and to the east of the Ancient Agora.

Roman Agora - The Roman Forum
Roman Agora – The Roman Forum

This site was built around 100 metres east of the original agora by Eucles of Marathon between 27 BC and 17 BC (or possibly in 10 BC), using funds donated by Augustus, in fulfilment of a promise originally made by Julius Caesar in 51 BC. The Roman Agora has not today been fully excavated, but is known to have been an open space surrounded by a peristyle. To its south was a fountain. To its west, behind a marble colonnade, were shops and an Ionic propylaeum (entrance), the Gate of Athena Archegetis. To its east was a Doric gate, the East Propylon, next to the Tower of the Winds and a set of “vespasianae”. An inscription records the existence of an Agoranomion (an office for market officials).

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Annunciation, also known as the Metropolis or Mitropoli, is the cathedral church of the Archbishopric of Athens and all of Greece.

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

Construction of the cathedral began on Christmas Day, 1842 placing of the cornerstone by King Otto and Queen Amalia. Workers used marble from 72 demolished churches to build the cathedral’s immense walls for the beautiful, relatively modern church.

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

In the Mitropoleos Square in front of the cathedral stand two statues. The first is that of Constantine XI, the last emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire. The second is a statue of Archbishop Damaskinos who was Archbishop of Athens during World War II, renowned for his heroic acts standing against the Nazis in the war.

statue of Archbishop Damaskinos Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Statue of Archbishop Damaskinos Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

The Metropolitan Cathedral remains a major landmark in Athens and the site of important ceremonies with national political figures present, as well as weddings and funerals of notable personalities.

Church of Agios Eleftherios – Little Metropolis

Church of Agios Eleftherios – Little Metropolis
Church of Agios Eleftherios – Little Metropolis

The Little Metropolis or Panagia Gorgoepikoos (“Panagia Who Grants Requests Quickly”), is a Byzantine church located at the Mitropoleos Square. The church is built on top of the ruins of an ancient temple dedicated to the goddess Eileithyia. Historians do not know exactly when it was built, but dates for construction have been proposed, from the 9th century under Empress Irene of Athens to the 13th century.

Church of Agios Eleftherios – Little Metropolis
Church of Agios Eleftherios – Little Metropolis

Statue of Lord Byron

Statue of Lord Byron
Statue of Lord Byron

On the way to the Arch of Hadrian, you see a statue of of Lord Byron. The Lord Byron Statue is a memorial to Lord Byron’s role in the Greek War of Independence.

Hadrian’s Arch

Arch of Hadrian
Arch of Hadrian

The Arch of Hadrian, commonly known as Hadrian’s Gate, is a monumental gateway resembling—in some respects—a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens, by a group of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus.

Arch of Hadrian
Arch of Hadrian and Acropolis of Athens

It has been proposed that the arch was built to celebrate the arrival of the Roman emperor Hadrian and to honor him for his many benefactions to the city, on the occasion of the dedication of the nearby temple complex in approx. 131 AD. It is not certain who commissioned the arch, although it is probable that it was the citizens of Athens. There were two inscriptions on the arch, facing in opposite directions, naming both Theseus and Hadrian as founders of Athens.

Temple of Olympian Zeus

This site is under major construction and there is not much to see but knowing this information will help you visualize that is actually there now, and what will be there.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is a former colossal temple at the center of the Greek capital. It was dedicated to “Olympian” Zeus, a name originating from his position as head of the Olympian gods. Construction began in the 6th century BC during the rule of the Athenian tyrants, who envisaged building the greatest temple in the ancient world, but it was not completed until the reign of Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, some 638 years after the project had begun. During the Roman period, the temple, which included 104 colossal columns, was renowned as the largest temple in Greece and housed one of the largest cult statues in the ancient world.

Choragic Monument of Lysicrates

Choragic Monument of Lysicrates
Choragic Monument of Lysicrates

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates near the Acropolis was built by the choregos Lysicrates, a wealthy patron of musical performances in the Theater of Dionysus, to commemorate the prize in the dithyramb contest of the City Dionysia in 335/334 BCE, in which he performed. The monument is known as the first use of the Corinthian order on the exterior of a building. It has been reproduced widely in modern monuments and building elements.

Neighborhood called Anafiotika

Neighborhood called Anafiotika
Neighborhood called Anafiotika

Anafiotika is a scenic tiny neighborhood of Athens, part of the old historical neighborhood called Plaka. It lies on the northeast side of the Acropolis hill. The first houses were built in the era of Otto of Greece, when workers from the island of Anafi came to Athens in order to work as construction workers in the refurbishment of King Othon’s Palace. Soon, more workers from other Cycladic islands also started to arrive there, to work as carpenters or even stone and marble workers, in a further building reconstruction period in Athens. The workers built this neighborhood according to typical Cycladic architecture, and even nowadays gives to visitors the feel of Greek islands in the heart of the city, with white walls and small spaces, usually with the presence of bougainvillea flowers.

Neighborhood called Anafiotika
View from the Top of The Neighborhood called Anafiotika

From the top of this neighborhood, you get an amazing view of modern Athens.

Ancient Agora of Athens

The ancient Agora of Athens is the best-known example of an ancient Greek agora, located to the northwest of the Acropolis and bounded on the south by the hill of the Areopagus and on the west by the hill known as the Agoraios Kolonos, also called Market Hill. The Agora’s initial use was for a commercial, assembly, or residential gathering place.

Statue of Emperor Hadrian

Statue of Emperor Hadrian
Statue of Emperor Hadrian

This headless statue from the 2nd century AD might be hard to recognize. It is a larger than life sculpture of Emperor Hadrian located in the Ancient Agora. Note the Goddess Athena in the center of his breastplate. The Greek goddess is standing on a she-wolf suckling Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. Implying Greece helped to make Rome what it had become. Hadrian was a Roman emperor from 117 through 138 AD. He was also a chief magistrate of Athens from 125 – 129 AD.

Stoa of Attalos

Stoa of Attalos
Stoa of Attalos Athens Greece

The Stoa of Attalos was a covered walkway or portico) in the Agora of Athens. Built by and named after King Attalos II of Pergamon, who ruled between 159 BC and 138 BC. The the American School of Classical Studies at Athens reconstructed this building from 1952 to 1956.

Temple of Hephaestus

Temple of Hephaestus
Temple of Hephaestus Athens Greece

The Temple Hephaestus is well-preserved. It is largely intact today. It is a Doric peripteral temple, and is located at the north-west side of the Agora of Athens, on top of the Agoraios Kolonos hill. From the 7th century until 1834, it served as the Greek Orthodox church of Saint George Akamates. The building’s condition has been maintained due to its history of varied use.

Temple of Hephaestus Athens Greece
Temple of Hephaestus Athens Greece

Church of the Holy Apostles

Church of the Holy Apostles
Church of the Holy Apostles

You will find the Church of the Holy Apostles, also known as Holy Apostles of Solaki, in the Ancient Agora of Athens, next to the Stoa of Attalos. It has been dated to around the late 10th century. “Solakis” may be the family name of those who sponsored a renovation of the church in the Ottoman Period, or from “Solaki” for the densely populated area around the church in the 19th century.

The church is particularly significant as the only monument in the Agora, other than the Temple of Hephaestus, to survive intact since its foundation, and for its architecture: it was the first significant church of the Middle Byzantine period in Athens, and marks the beginning of the so-called “Athenian type”, successfully combining the simple four-pier with the cross-in-square forms.

Hew, what a day. There is so much to see, so much to do, and so much to eat.

The Second Day of Exploring in Athens

Acropolis of Athens

Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis of Athens

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient military stronghold located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens, and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historical significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. The term acropolis is generic and there are many other acropoleis in Greece. During ancient times the Acropolis of Athens was also more properly known as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man Cecrops, the supposed first Athenian king.

Pericles in the fifth century BC coordinated the construction of the buildings, including the Parthenon, the Propylaea, the Erechtheion, and the Temple of Athena Nike, whose present remains are the site’s most important ones, despite evidence that the hill was inhabited as early as the fourth millennium BC. During the 1687 siege by the Venetians in the Morean War, the Parthenon and the other buildings suffered serious damage when a Venetian bombardment hit gunpowder stored by the then Turkish rulers in the Parthenon, causing it to explode.

Odeon of Herodes Atticus Acropolis Athens Greece

Odeon of Herodes Atticus Acropolis Athens Greece
Odeon of Herodes Atticus Acropolis Athens Greece

Herodes Atticus built the Odeon of Herodes Atticus, a stone Roman theatre structure located on the southwest slope of the Acropolis of Athens, Greece, in AD 161. The building, initially completed in AD 161, underwent renovation in 1950.

In memory of his Roman wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla, Herodes Atticus constructed it in AD 161. The theater, originally a steep-sloped structure with a three-story stone front wall and a wooden roof made of expensive cedar of Lebanon timber, had a capacity of 5,000 and was used as a venue for music concerts. It remained intact until the Heruli destroyed it and left it in ruins in AD 267.

Modern Theater

The audience stands and the orchestra (stage) were restored using Pentelic marble in the 1950s. Since then it has been the main venue of the Athens Festival, which runs from May through October each year, featuring a variety of acclaimed Greek as well as International performances.

Temple of Athena Nike Acropolis Athens Greece

Temple of Athena Nike Acropolis Athens Greece
Temple of Athena Nike Acropolis Athens Greece

The Temple of Athena Nike is a temple on the Acropolis of Athens, dedicated to the goddesses Athena and Nike. Built around 420 BC, the temple is the earliest fully Ionic temple on the Acropolis. It has a prominent position on a steep bastion at the south west corner of the Acropolis to the right of the entrance, the Propylaea. In contrast to the Acropolis proper, a walled sanctuary entered through the Propylaea, the Victory Sanctuary was open, entered from the Propylaea’s southwest wing and from a narrow stair on the north. The sheer walls of its bastion were protected on the north, west, and south by the Nike Parapet, named for its frieze of Nikai celebrating victory and sacrificing to their patroness, Athena and Nike.

Athena Nike

Nike was the goddess of victory in Greek mythology, and Athena was worshipped in this form, representative of being victorious in war. The citizens worshipped the goddesses in hopes of a successful outcome in the long Peloponnesian War fought against the Spartans and allies.

The Parthenon at the Acropolis

The Parthenon at the Acropolis
The Parthenon at the Acropolis

During the fifth century BC, the ancient Greeks dedicated the Parthenon, a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, to the goddess Athena. Some of the high points of classical Greek art are its decorative sculptures, making it an enduring symbol of Ancient Greece, democracy, and Western civilization.

In thanksgiving for the Hellenic victory over Persian Empire invaders during the Greco-Persian Wars, they built the Parthenon. Additionally, like most Greek temples, it served as the city treasury.

Ancient Temple of Athena at the Acropolis Athens Greece

Ancient Temple of Athena at the Acropolis Athens Greece
Ancient Temple of Athena at the Acropolis Athens Greece

The archaic Greek limestone Doric temple on the Acropolis of Athens, probably built in the second half of the sixth-century BCE, was the Old Temple of Athena. The discovery of substantial building foundations under the raised terrace between the Erechtheion and Parthenon in 1886 confirmed the long-conjectured existence of an archaic temple to Athena from literary references. Although it is uncontroversial that a temple stood on the central acropolis terrace in the late archaic period and was burnt down in the Persian invasion of 480, questions regarding its nature, name, reconstruction, and duration remain unresolved.

Ancient Temple of Athena at the Acropolis Athens Greece
Ancient Temple of Athena at the Acropolis Athens Greece

The ancient Greek temple known as the Erechtheion, held up by statues called Caryatids, was dedicated to the gods Athena and Poseidon; it still stands on the Athens Acropolis, much like the Parthenon just meters away, as a testament to the glory of ancient Greece. Considered the most sacred part of the Acropolis, the stunningly beautiful marble building was constructed along the lines of the Ionic order. Six statues of maidens, known as the Caryatids and created from 421 BC to 406 BC, support the southern roof of the Erechtheion. An ancient inscription of the Erechtheion simply refers to the Caryatids as Korai (maidens), but the term karyatides means “maidens of Karyai,” an ancient town of Peloponnese.

Acropolis Museum

Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece
Six Statues of Maidens ~ Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece

The modern stunningly beautiful Acropolis Museum is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. The Acropolis Museum also lies over the ruins of part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens.

Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece
Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece

The museum was founded in 2003 while the Organization of the Museum was established in 2008. It opened to the public on 20 June 2009. More than 4,250 objects are exhibited over an area of 14,000 square meters.

Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece
Exhibition at the Acropolis Museum Athens Greece

Meet to Group

Ioannis Droseros our G Adventures Greek Tour Guide
Ioannis Droseros our G Adventures Greek Tour Guide

It was time to met up with the tour group from G-Adventures. We met our guide, Ioannis Droseros, a Greek who speaks great English. Finally we met up with our fellow travelers. We spent the next 15 days with this group of people, and luckily we had personalities that meshed. We chatted about our itinerary and how the rest of the tour was going to work. Then it was off to dinner. We had a fabulous dinner at sunset right below The Acropolis. Wow spectacular!

3rd Day in Athens

This day was going to be the first full day with the group. So we eat a good breakfast, went for another walking adventure for the morning.  On this outing, we visited three important government buildings.

National Library of Greece

National Library of Greece
National Library of Greece

The National Library of Greece is the main public library of Greece, located in Athens. Founded by Ioannis Kapodistrias in 1832, its mission is to locate, collect, organize, describe and preserve the perpetual evidence of Greek culture and its uptake over time, as well as important representative evidence of human intellectual production. The NLG ensures equal non-access to these items based on the freedom of knowledge, information, and research. There is one general manager who serves a four-year term. A board of trustees has seven members with a three or four-year term.

Athens University

Athens University
Athens University

The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, usually referred to simply as the University of Athens (UoA), is a public university in Zografou, a suburban town in the Athens agglomeration, Greece.

It has been in continuous operation since its establishment in 1837 and is the oldest higher education institution of the modern Greek state and the first contemporary university in both the Balkan Peninsula and the Eastern Mediterranean. Today it is one of the largest universities by enrollment in Europe, with over 69,000 registered students.

The Academy of Athens

The Academy of Athens
The Academy of Athens

This impressive place, the Academy of Athens, is Greece’s national academy, and the highest research establishment in the country. It was established in 1926, with its founding principle traces back to the historical Academy of Plato, and operates under the supervision of the Ministry of Education. The Academy’s main building is one of the major landmarks of Athens.

History and structure

The Academy of Athens
The Academy of Athens Interior

The organization of the Academy of Athens, whose title hearkens back to the ancient Academy of Plato, was first established on 18 March 1926, and its charter was ratified by the law 4398/1929. This charter, with subsequent amendments, is still valid and governs the Academy’s affairs. According to it, the Academy is divided into three Orders: Natural Sciences, Letters and Arts, Moral and Political Sciences.

The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience

The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece
The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece

This afternoon, we had a Greek cooking experience with – The Greek Kitchen – Athens. We made classic eggplant, potato, and meat musakka, Greek salad (salad), amazing olives, tzatziki, feta, bread, and of course wine.

The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece
The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece

The chef, our teacher was a great instructor. The event was a ton of fun, and the meal was fabulous.

The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece
The Greek Kitchen Culinary Experience Athens Greece

Greek Cultural Experience Food Wine Dancing Breaking Plates

Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos
Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos

That evening we were in for a treat. We had a Greek cultural culinary experience on the agenda. We were heading to Tavern Kalokerinos, in the Plaka area which was teaming with excitement. The evening start with traditional stringed music, and wine, singing, and wine, dancing, and wine, and a fabulous meal. Of course we finished with baklava and raki, two things that have become a favorites of mine.   I had baklava at least ten times on this trip and each time it was amazing. I can not eat American baklava any more.

Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos
Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos

The evening was filled with joy, we danced, and we had a great time with our group.

 

 

 

 

 

Most of our Group Last Night in Athens Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos
Most of our Group Last Night in Athens Greek Cultural Culinary Experience Tavern Kalokerinos

Fun Greek Cultural Event at Tavern Kalokerinos

 

Your Athens Greece Adventures Await

After all of this, you feel exhausted, but pleasantly so. The history is simply awe-inspiring, and the architecture is fabulous. You will enjoy taking in the city by visiting museums, palaces, cathedrals, and so much more. Start planning your trip to Athens  with these must-see recommendations!

We plan all of our trips with Ted Blank.

Ted Blank Contact Information
ted@tedblanktravel.com
(651) 964-8245
https://tedblanktravel.com
Travel Inspiration

Of course we have a general idea of what we want to hit on our trip, Ted helps us to make the itinerary flow smoothly and then he works out all the details of transportation, hotels, passes, insurance, etc. I highly recommend working with him when you plan your next trip.

If you have any questions, please to not hesitate to Contact Us, and until next time, get out and capture the adventure.

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3 Days Athens Greece Itinerary

 

Written by Wayne Moran - Visit Website
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